Salvation

Salvation

In April, 2014, Wings of Hope Ranch received a call from a lady in New Kent County who had rescued a mare named “Sal” from a man in the area who had been unable to care for his horse or his dogs. From her account, the owner had ridden Sal on many trail rides in the past, but alcohol became a factor in his ability to ride or care for his animals. Due to the owner’s condition, the mare and dogs were left outside in the winter with no food or water. In addition to the lack of shelter, food and water, Sal also had an injury to her flexor tendon that was going untreated, leaving Sal permanently lame in her rear left leg. Sadly, Sal was also scolded repeatedly by her owner by holding and twisting her left ear, which resulted in tearing of her ear cartilage and a permanently sagging ear. The New Kent woman made arrangements to take Sal from the owner and then called us to find a permanent home for Sal.

When we drove up to meet Sal, she was pastured with a stubborn gelding that she had been “taming.” Sal was very eager for visitors and was “bombproof”. Her 15.2 hand frame and her unique tri-color paint body were a beautiful sight. She willingly lifted her legs and followed every instruction perfectly with no hesitation or objection. Despite her lameness, she went right into her Tennessee walker gait and seemed to be very content and happy no matter what.

Her walk and gait might be a little off and her confirmation a little less than what most would seek in a horse, but Salvation is perfectly beautiful in our eyes. She quickly became friends with the other mares and she was ridden by a camper for her first “job” at our 2014 summer camp program. After her arrival, the ranchers and volunteers had a contest to give Sal a new bible name. There were no less than 30 suggested names for our new horse. After a month of voting, the results were tallied and it was a landslide win for her new name….”Salvation”. A perfect choice on so many levels.

Sal’s best buddy is Blossom. They enjoy hanging out in the paddock together because neither can eat much grass. This is due to their susceptibility to a condition called laminitis. In an effort to really boost her overall health, Sal enjoyed a 2 month stay at Aunt Vicki’s TLC camp for horses the winter of 2015. Sal had her legs stretched and wrapped daily and she was treated to the best feed possible. We are grateful to have Sal and our volunteers who have seen to it that she has a good twilight season of her life!